Japan Camera Hunter http://www.japancamerahunter.com Find the camera of your dreams Wed, 02 Sep 2015 20:07:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Get Featured: Duran Levinsonhttp://www.japancamerahunter.com/2015/09/get-featured-duran-levinson-2/ http://www.japancamerahunter.com/2015/09/get-featured-duran-levinson-2/#comments Wed, 02 Sep 2015 19:18:18 +0000 http://www.japancamerahunter.com/?p=21628 Get Featured: Duran Levinson Duran shares with us his work from a series he has been working on about Rwanda. Duran tries to capture the changes since the genocide of the Tutsi people 20 years ago. Read on. My name is Duran Levinson; I am a 26-year-old film photographer & cinematographer from Cape Town, South […]

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Get Featured: Duran Levinson
Duran shares with us his work from a series he has been working on about Rwanda. Duran tries to capture the changes since the genocide of the Tutsi people 20 years ago. Read on.

My name is Duran Levinson; I am a 26-year-old film photographer & cinematographer from Cape Town, South Africa.
I am interested in telling stories and documenting life in a unique way. I have been taking my photography seriously for 1-½ years and shoot exclusively on film as I have a huge passion for analog story telling.

I recently spent two weeks in Rwanda. I was there to take photos and find stories worth telling. The project itself turned out to be a journey around the whole country meeting all kinds of wonderful people who shared insights with me, which in turn lead to a lot of self discovery. I believe the story can be interpreted as a contemporary African photo essay that represents life 21 years after the Rwandan genocide.

“INDIVISIBLE”
An analog photo essay on life in modern day Rwanda

Written & Photographed by Duran Levinson Edited by Annie Brookstone
July 2015

Can a photograph really tell a story? Can we accurately portray anything when by nature the medium is framed and manipulated to create the image the photographer wants you to see? There seems to be an inherent problem with pointing a camera at anything these days. This is the photographer’s dilemma, on a quest to feel something real and portray it as honestly as possible through a single moment in time.

In April 1994 between 800 000 and a million Tutsis were murdered in Rwanda. Six years old at the time, I too young to comprehend world news, unaware of the wave of violence sweeping through a country only a short flight from my home in South Africa.

Twenty-one years later I arrive in Kigali by myself. I have a travel backpack, two analog cameras, an empty notebook and no idea what to expect. First came the offer to travel to Rwanda to work on a commercial and spend two weeks exploring the country. The next step was getting onto the first available flight. I haven’t had time to think beyond that. All I know is that my plan is to take pictures and document life in present- day Rwanda. I don’t know what stories I’ll stumble upon and what experiences I’ll have. I’m just another tourist with a camera…

Kigali City surprises me from the moment I arrive. The streets are pristine, the green rolling hills and endless valleys are picture perfect as I whizz downtown on the back of a moto-taxi. Roadside plastic gorillas are my welcoming party as we dart through the traffic – them and the signs urging “Kwibuka” the Kinyarwanda word for “remember”.

I am staying in a complete stranger’s house, but he welcomes me with open arms, as do most people – a good sign of things to come, I hope. My first stop is the Genocide Museum in Gisozi. Standing above a mass grave with 250 000 people buried below me is impossible to describe: it doesn’t feel real.
I don’t want to go anywhere because of preconceived notions, so I decide to dive into Kigali. Nothing feels off-limits. I walk around a Kacyiru and people stare. I understand how painfully out of place I am. I sit with kids playing in the dirt. One of them asks for my pen and I have to break up the resulting fight over. I visit a small arts center for kids. I bond with creative kids. Children represent a large percentage of the Rwandan population and while more than 60% of the population lives in poverty; Rwanda has the highest primary school enrollment rates in Africa for both boys and girls.

Downtown Kigali is a busy place. People pack trucks with goods into the sky. People barter on every block. Reaching Nyabugogo is a photographer’s dream. The transport hub for the whole of East Africa is a chaotic symphony of floods of people and buses in all directions, the bustling business of a major transport route. I meet a fixer and some people who are keen to laugh and talk to us. My new friend doesn’t speak a word of English but we spend the next six hours together and he understands me enough to help me meet and capture portraits of people I come in contact with.

Our bond feels like something solid, calm, in the bedlam and I’m sad when our day comes to an end and we part ways.
At a local market I meet men practicing unorthodox medical diagnoses with laptops, treadmills and buckets of water. I get roped into a nice man’s business to test out his medial assessments free of charge. I agree. Within minutes a crowd has gathered to watch the “Umzungu” get his medical tests done. He tells me my liver and head is damaged and suggests moving onto traditional healing next. I thank him for his time but decline. By now the queue of people lining up for his business has quadrupled. I feel happy to have helped and we exchange details, I shoot some photos and call it a day.

I wander into any area without fear. Safety is Rwanda is paramount – beyond that of any other country I’ve visited. People keep asking me if I’m lost but I feel like I’m on the right track. I visit Camp Kigali, a memorial to the 10 Belgian UN peacekeepers who were killed here in the 7th April 1994. Bullet holes texture every surface and the floor is riddled with grenade craters. I sit on the floor and try to reflect on what happened in this space. Echoing life back at home in South Africa, it’s a strong reminder of how much can change in two decades.
If Camp Kigali is a quiet memorial to the past, the densely packed markets plunge me straight back into the present tense. They’re lined with every fruit and vegetable imaginable; the clothing goes on forever. Nine out of 10 people in Rwanda are subsistence farmers – this is business at its finest in the third world.

A drive towards the border and Lake Kivu allows me some insight into rural life here. I photograph an elderly woman hard at work – women are the backbones of their villages and the country as a whole – her lined face standing in stark contrast to those of the many children also at work in the endless fields. The countryside inspires me to take some of my favorite photos of the trip; disparity is everywhere, in those faces in the fields and in the ever-present natural beauty and profound poverty coexisting in every frame.

Nyamirambo is unlike anywhere else in Rwanda. It’s a culturally rich area where art, religion and diversity merge seamlessly. I befriend some local hip-hop heads and they take me to “California City”, one of the darker and more interesting hoods of Nyamirambo. Cruising the frenetic secondhand clothing markets, people haggling for the best deals in every direction, I’m so painfully out of place that it’s wonderful. This creates some special photo opportunities, after which we grab brochettes (goat on a skewer) for lunch and I spend the rest of my time in Nyamirambo befriending locals and sharing stories.

One of my final days in Rwanda is spent shooting a music video for a local rapper. We end up shooting in an abandoned zoo on the top of a mountain and I feel like I’m truly in a location that has never been photographed like this before. A large group of rappers and kids come to hang out with us and join in on the fun; still, the laughter and jokes we share don’t belie their hardships of life for young adults in Rwanda.
Tenacity. It’s a theme that follows me to the end of the trip. Rwanda gives me hope that countries dealing with instability and turmoil can go on to heal and produce a positive future for all their citizens. I know what I have seen & photographed and I hope that I am telling that story.
The End.

Duran Levinson

duranlevinson.com
@duranite

Thanks for sharing your project with us Duran. It is a fascinating insight into the genocide and how it has shaped a society. Really great work.

Come on, share with us what you have and get yourself featured.
Click on this link and send in your project/work: Get Featured. *I am looking for mainly projects, not individual images*
Oh, and click here to see a few of the photographers that have been on the site before http://www.japancamerahunter.com/?s=featured

Please make sure you come and comment, polite and constructive critique is welcome.
Thanks
JCH

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In your bag No: 1256 – Erik Bratsberghttp://www.japancamerahunter.com/2015/09/in-your-bag-no-1256-erik-bratsberg/ http://www.japancamerahunter.com/2015/09/in-your-bag-no-1256-erik-bratsberg/#comments Wed, 02 Sep 2015 18:47:12 +0000 http://www.japancamerahunter.com/?p=21742 In your bag No: 1256, Erik Bratsberg Eric brings us a strong bag, all the way from Canada. A bundle of great cameras and a whole boatload of film too. Looks like he needs some convenient contraption to store all of that in… Hi there JCH! I’ve been viewing In Your Bag for awhile now, […]

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In your bag No: 1256, Erik Bratsberg
Eric brings us a strong bag, all the way from Canada. A bundle of great cameras and a whole boatload of film too. Looks like he needs some convenient contraption to store all of that in…

Hi there JCH!

I’ve been viewing In Your Bag for awhile now, and figured I should contribute to the fun.

This set up I put together for a trip I’m taking to Alberta Canada. More specifically Banff and the surrounding areas, where I’ll be shooting landscapes and Calgary for some city fun.

I’m using a Herschel Supply Co. Heritage bag, which I Macgyver’d into a camera bag to hold my Bronica with also a little space to keep the T2 as needed. I used existing padding I have from some old bags, which wouldn’t be up to the task anymore.

– Bronica SQ-A: Weighs a ton, but is worth it for the images its capable of.
– Contax G1 + 45mm planar f/2. Just got this guy, and am excited to see what the lens many talk about can do.
– Contax T2: Out of all my point and shoots, it’s definitely the most durable and having the option of seeing your shutter speeds and choosing apertures makes it hard to leave at home.
– Kodak Portra 160 and 400
– Notebook
– Pen
– Wallet

Some of my work can be found at:

http://sometimeperhaps.tumblr.com
https://www.flickr.com/photos/45348864@N04/

Thanks!
Erik

Thanks for sharing your bag with us, Eric. That Bronica is a bit of a beast.
Check out the links and please make sure you come and comment.

Keep them coming folks, we need more submissions, so get your bag on Japancamerahunter.com.

Send me a hi resolution image of the bag. Optimum size is 1500 across. Please ensure there is a bag in the shot, unless you don’t use one. The more you can write about yourself the better, make it appealing and tell us a story.

Oh and don’t forget your contact details (twitter, flickr, tumbler et al). Send the bag shots here. Please understand that there is a long wait now as there is a backlog of submissions. Not all make the cut, so make sure yours is funny/interesting/quirky. And please make sure the shot is of good quality, as the ones that are not do not go up.

Cheers
Japancamerahunter

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In your bag No: 1255 – Ron Wolfehttp://www.japancamerahunter.com/2015/09/in-your-bag-no-1255-ron-wolfe/ http://www.japancamerahunter.com/2015/09/in-your-bag-no-1255-ron-wolfe/#comments Mon, 31 Aug 2015 19:10:12 +0000 http://www.japancamerahunter.com/?p=21737 In your bag No: 1255, Ron Wolfe Ron shares with us not only his bag, but his film stash too. And what a setup he has, that classic Barnack is a stunner. Check it out. Another huge fan of the site and the videos you’re now producing, great stuff! I’d like to submit my bag […]

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In your bag No: 1255, Ron Wolfe
Ron shares with us not only his bag, but his film stash too. And what a setup he has, that classic Barnack is a stunner. Check it out.

Another huge fan of the site and the videos you’re now producing, great stuff! I’d like to submit my bag shot for your consideration.

My background with photography dates back to high school photo classes in the mid 80’s. I had the great opportunity to take this in school that sadly many kids today don’t have including my 16 year old son, Kyle. I was on/off with photography through college and grad school but it was Kyle’s recent interest that brought me back to photography. I’ve tried to impart the basics with manual exposure, composition and working within constraints of a single prime lens by forbidding zooms :D but he now far surpasses me especially utilizing all the current technology. We’ve dabbled grandpas Rolleiflex 2.8E and my old Toyo 45a field as well. I can’t say he is as drawn to film as I, but anything that inspires him to create images is fine with me. Shooting film for me is not simply capturing a moment but it’s all that one must consider…which film? do I shoot it at box speed/push/pull? which body/lens? which developer? will i scan this for web/print or am i going to spend time in the darkroom? Each aspect is a choice and a process that makes this such an enjoyable way to spend life and seeing the world again with new eyes and experiencing it along side my sons contagious enthusiasm.

In the bag
Body/lens
1) I had sold my M6 I had after my sons were born think that film was doomed. Of course this has thankfully not come to fruition. I loved that M6 and so when I sought to replace it, I spent the kids college fund (just kidding) on a used early MP which is brassing up nicely. Attached is an amazing 50mm Summilux.
2) This is something new to me but is such a pleasure to shoot. I feel it is a cool piece of 35mm history before the M’s, a masterpiece from Oskar Barnack design, a Leica IIIf RD-ST. Attached is late and flawless Summaron 3.5cm f3.5 along with a metal Voigtlander 35mm VF.

Bag
-Hard to beat a Billingham Hadley Small for its quality and performance

Stuff
-iPhone 5s with a Lumu when I don’t want to advance a frame in the MP to meter and lighting to difficult for me to sunny 16 it.
-BART (light rail) card for the obvious use for transportation into San Francisco from my home but also for loading film into the Barnack.
-Can’t go anywhere w/o organizing the film in my JCH 5 roll holder

Attached is a shot of the bag and my film stash for roll / sheet and bulk loading. I am film agonistic, whatever is cheap. I’m currently shooting expired a 100′ TMAX 400 from 1997 I got for $25 along with another 100′ for TMAX100 waiting in the fridge.

I shot for me which usually means vintage cars and rally events and life travels. My son got me to start sharing on line so I’m on iwolfe.tumblr.com, while Kyle is at instagram.com/kylewolfe1999 . Maybe I can get him to submit a bag shot as well.

Cheers Bellamy and keep up the great work.

Thanks for sharing your bag with us, Ron. Cool to see you sharing your passion with your son too.
Check out the links and please make sure you come and comment.

Keep them coming folks, we need more submissions, so get your bag on Japancamerahunter.com.

Send me a hi resolution image of the bag. Optimum size is 1500 across. Please ensure there is a bag in the shot, unless you don’t use one. The more you can write about yourself the better, make it appealing and tell us a story.

Oh and don’t forget your contact details (twitter, flickr, tumbler et al). Send the bag shots here. Please understand that there is a long wait now as there is a backlog of submissions. Not all make the cut, so make sure yours is funny/interesting/quirky. And please make sure the shot is of good quality, as the ones that are not do not go up.

Cheers
Japancamerahunter

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A Learning Framework For Photographyhttp://www.japancamerahunter.com/2015/08/a-learning-framework-for-photography/ http://www.japancamerahunter.com/2015/08/a-learning-framework-for-photography/#comments Mon, 31 Aug 2015 08:46:34 +0000 http://www.japancamerahunter.com/?p=21728 A Learning Framework For Photography – By Dan K After a long hiatus, Dan K is back with another one of his brilliant and informative articles. In this one Dan helps us to put together a system of learning for your photography. Something I think I myself often overlook. Read on. Introduction I have watched […]

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A Learning Framework For Photography – By Dan K
After a long hiatus, Dan K is back with another one of his brilliant and informative articles. In this one Dan helps us to put together a system of learning for your photography. Something I think I myself often overlook. Read on.

Introduction

I have watched my own photography improve over the years. Looking back, I have taken many wrong turns, gotten stuck in a rut or two and wasted much time and money in the haphazard way in which I have developed. The objective of this essay is to help beginner and intermediate photographers to climb the learning curve faster and more efficiently than I have done.

The Wrong Way

When my son started drawing, people dismissed his work as unintelligible scribbles. They missed the point that each was a piece of live performance art going on inside his head. As he explained it, each line traced the path of a protagonist in his journey across the galaxy, encountering aliens and black holes. He could tell and retell the same story time and time again, complete with sound effects.
Next he learned the basic method of making a recognizable image and combined them into little one page graphic novels and now he’s working on telling the story in the viewer’s head using only one picture. He can’t reproduce true to life imagery like his elder sister can, but his pictures are enthralling. It is the difference between an artist and an illustrator, or a photographic artist and a skilled camera technician.

If only I had started out making art and worked on improving my execution, a lot less of my early photographic efforts wouldn’t be well executed but meaningless tat.

Source: 4CHAN /p/

I think we have all seen and laughed at the “Stages of a Photographer” learning curve and cringed in recognition at stages we have gone through. As a typical Generation-X kid, I played with my parents cameras, and then learned photography at school in our art department, where I learned how to use a Nikon FM and process the film into black and white prints in the darkroom. The main focus was on the basic process as opposed to the art. I was just told to “express myself”, or whatever that was supposed to mean.
Topics like the history of the photographic medium, artistic appreciation and the execution of genres was supposed to be taught at college and I subsequently missed out on all of that as I was diverted towards more career path that would pay the bills. It wasn’t until I had my own children that I reached a point in life where I could find the time to take photography seriously as a hobby. This coincided with the tumultuous stage of the digital revolution when digital cameras came to dominance and film gear was sold off cheaply. I became a serious gear-head, but was saved by my love of classic film cameras maturing into love of the images they produced. It was this that motivated me to take the art more seriously and improve my photography.

Almost all art involves the combination of artistic development and technical proficiency. Indeed the gear and need for technical skill drew me into photography. One of the greatest truisms is to abandon all “automatic modes” and shoot in full manual mode, with manual control over aperture, shutter speed, and focus.
For me, I had no choice, because I was using a meterless 1950’s film rangefinder that I had been gifted as a birthday present. I found it hard to work quick enough to capture the moment and hard to get usable results even from static subjects. I found the whole experience off-putting. The use of film meant I lacked instant feedback and had a hard time learning from my mistakes. The low point was trying to use expensive and tricky to expose slide film. It took me a year just to get back to the level of proficiency that I once had in my school days. In the end, I had to take a step back and buy a automatic film compact camera before making forward progress. I took back control of aperture then shutter speed and focus. Only then was I able to work up to composition, presentation and message.

In short, I had it all arse-backwards for most of my life.

An Alternative Approach

I have set out below a series of steps to bring a beginner through to advanced photographic artist. If, like me, you’ve built skills but find something lacking, go back and revisit anything you haven’t done properly, even if it means locking your Leica in a dry box and going back to step one. You can always skip the bits you’ve got figured out as you work down the list.

Step 1: Get An Eye For Photography

By embracing modern automation and technology we can start with the art and then learn the process.

If at all possible find a mentor, or a teacher. Most people will give you the well meant but flawed traditional advice that I received and you will find yourself with a German-made shelf ornament and no images worthy of the camera to hang beside it on the wall. Instead, ask your mentor to show you their best work and critique it together. If you don’t like his work, be polite, because egos are fragile.

You’ve heard the expression “Those who can do and those who can’t… teach”. That’s a half truth, at best. Sometimes a person has knowledge and the ability to pass it on without being able to do excel at it themselves. Regardless, you will have to outgrow your teacher’s ability unless you are content to be his clone. Look at photo books and images in photo collections. Find the images that speak to you and go over them with your mentor. Learn to appreciate a good image, be it a photograph or a sketch. A reasonably acute Artistic Eye should be the fundamental foundation upon which your photography should be built, rather than something you will get round to once you’ve topped out on your technical expertise.

You can do all this without a camera, but once you know what you want to do try to see what it takes to recreate the shot. I have been involved with enough beach and fashion photography to know that I don’t want to work with complex lighting, wardrobe, make up, location hassles and logistics. Regardless of your ambition, initially pick a genre that can be done with basic skills and focus not on the equipment, execution or look, but on making the image engage the viewer as intended. Focus, sharpness, depth of field, lighting, colour, all that kind of thing is embellishment. Even composition is subordinate to the engagement, to the message and to the reaction that you hope to elicit from the reader.

You probably own a camera, but you are probably better off starting out by practicing with a phone camera app in basic mode. This eliminates thoughts of process and gives instant feedback. Go through the whole classical learning cycle with each photo, each session, each project:

1. Take the photo.
2. Decide what you like or don’t like about it.
3. Consider what you could have done better.
4. How does what you learned apply to other photos you took or have seen?
5. Apply this to your next photo and repeat the cycle.

This feedback cycle can be individual, but it is more effective when done with a mentor who already understands the makings of a compelling image.

Feedback and learning is what separates an improving photographer from someone that sprays-and-prays but never improves. Remember that the learning process never finishes.

When you reach a plateau in the learning curve, don’t let your photography stagnate or photographer’s block will set in and you will lose passion. Instead, sit back and take stock. Consolidate your knowledge. Write notes if needed. Prepare a project of your learning journey. Then consider what other fresh avenues you can pursue to improve your work. This can be a technical proficiency or a new genre. You need a record of how your photography has evolved. At the very least, constantly post selected images to an image sharing site or dump them (time stamped) into a folder.

At the end of this step you should have a fair understanding of what an interesting and compelling image looks like and how to make one, even if the execution is rudimentary.

Step 2: Grasp the Basics

Set yourself a series of exploratory projects to develop your technical skills. Stress one particular aspect at a time. For example, when learning to hover a helicopter, you learn the pedals first, then collective, then cyclic, not all at once; it’s too much to handle in one go. In photography, I’d teach perspective (position and focal length) first, then focus (distance, aperture and depth of field), then shutter speed and exposure, then all aspects of colour. Each project can be both a learning experience and you can make a presentation out of it if you wish.

Learn that there is more than one way to get a look. For example, you can get the same depth of field as a 50mm lens with an 85mm that is about a stop slower and the difference in perspective is not as great as you’d imagine. I once had a room full of photography experts swear an image made by my Nikkor 85 f/1.4 was shot with a Noctilux. The difference in perspective is even less between two lenses of longer focal length.

This is the time to get a camera, preferably a digital camera that lets you take over each control. Resist the urge to buy extreme gear.

You need to grasp the basics well enough that you won’t forget the lesson, but there is no need to absolutely master them at this stage.

At the end of this step, you will have a good grasp of technical skills so that you can control the way the picture turns out. At this point, you should go back to step one and see how this can be applied to what you have previously learned about making images people would want to look at.

Step 3: Be Reductive

One of the most useful techniques in art is reduction. Take away all but that which you wish to draw attention to. Learn to drive the flow of the viewer’s attention using techniques like selective focus and lighting. Also learn to work within restrictions, such as one focal length, black and white, one ISO. Learn how far you can bend the rules and where the edge of the performance and aesthetic envelope lies. I find switching to film helped me to do this as the restriction of having one film in the camera took considerations of sensitivity and post-processed style out of the picture.

This is a good time to think about what camera is best suited to making the kind of images you enjoy and more importantly, what focal length and film works best for you. When you get to the point where you want to put together a photo book or show, having shot everything at one focal length, emulsion and topic will help the collection to stand together. Sir David Attenborough always wore the same shirt and pants over a TV series to avoid distracting the audience with thoughts about the significance of his change of wardrobe. For the same reason, I won’t slip a photo on colour film in with a bunch of black and whites.

At the end of this step, you will start to think about working within limitations. You will see that limitations. This is also the point where you start to develop a signature style. As always, go back to the beginning and see how your new knowledge applies to what you’ve learned before.

Step 4: Once You Can TAKE A Picture, Learn How To MAKE A Picture

Once you can take a decent image, and it doesn’t matter if you handled every detail or left it to the camera’s programming, you need to learn how to make a decent image. This is the stage where you learn creativity rather than observation. Learn how to arrange things for best composition rather than position yourself. Learn how to find and use natural light, or how to mimic it with flash. Learn how much control you can exert over the subject, context and equipment without losing the dynamic of the moment, the freshness and spontaneity. The goal is to be able to pro-actively get the shot that you wanted rather than being a passive observer.

The vast majority of people are more drawn to images with people than to images without people. Dealing with people is something that technical types like myself often have trouble with, but unless you can content yourself with landscapes, macro photography, still life, animals and candid photos, it is something you need to work on. A photographer needs interpersonal skills, and the ability to work with a subject overtly or subtly to get the desired group arrangement, pose, expression or vibe. For street photographers, confidence and disposition is the key skill.

This is a watershed in many a photographer’s career, when they become dependable shot makers rather than opportunistic photographers. Do not consider taking on any semi-commercial work until you can reliably deliver a consistent work product, come what may.

Step 5: Learn to Edit

We all need to be better editors of our own work. It’s not just about fixing things in post; I’m talking choosing about which images to show and which to throw.

Most photographers are known for only a few images in their career, but they often cringe at work they wished they hadn’t shown. A portfolio is often let down by a bad image. Unfortunately, if you haven’t worked through from step one, you might not be able to tell the difference between a mediocre image and a good one.

Step 6: Find Yourself

We eventually get to a point where we are comfortable with a certain look, a certain subject, or genre. Our work becomes recognizably ours. Sometimes this is done intentionally, sometimes we become well known for a subset of our work and everyone wants more of it. I know lots of singers; many can cover almost any artist or style, but one day they find their own voice.

For me, the work I enjoy showing most are of proud, courageous people in the vein of Depression era Farm Security Administration imagery, shot in the visual style of Vietnam War era Time/Life photography. A few of my recent images are included in this article. For this subject, I generally travel to working class parts of Southeast Asia. I mostly use Tri-X with a 58mm Noct-Nikkor at medium apertures on a Nikon F2AS, but I could just as well photograph different people with a DSLR and zoom lens as long as the intent and style of subject engagement is the same. The only fundamental is the images’ message: that happiness is to be found in all walks of life and that it is not dependent on wealth and it’s trappings but the spirit of individuals and their community.

Once you have your signature style and something to say, individual images take on singular meaning, rather than being about the gear and the mark it left on the image. You can’t buy this in a camera store and you can’t pay someone to teach it to you.

Step 7: Reinvent Yourself

Once well known many artists, especially commercial painters, get stuck reproducing essentially the same picture again and again with subtle variations. I admire those that can break out of this and find a second and a third style. This reinvigorates your photography. It stirs the creative juices and taps new markets. For example, my friend Mike G. Jackson was known for his commercially successful large format abstract prints of the Poppit Sands and abruptly started producing one-off luminograms. He won’t stop selling his Poppit Sands work, but the luminograms are selling to different customers.

By this stage, you no longer reference other people’s work; they reference yours. May we all reach this point!

Revisiting the Chart

Let’s take another look at that chart.

I have normalized the chart to where most people will fit relative to the general population of people who have some interest in taking pictures. I presume a modicum of natural ability, so theoretically “there is no level zero”.

Learning should be a continuous, life long process. Each stage represents a learning curve and every time you feel yourself reaching a plateau, it is time to move on to the next stage of your development. Initially you learn from the greats, then you learn from your peers, then you learn from your own body of experience, but the key is to persist and break out to the next level.

By starting out right, with an understanding of what a good photo looks like, confidence may take a beating at first but you’ll be on the right path with less time wasted with follies into unnecessary gear or special effects.

Refer back to the works of the acknowledged greats, to photographers you admire and to your peers and you will maintain an objective appraisal of your quality of work. Having a mentor who can see what you cannot will help until you have a solid foundation. I personally find that social media feedback, art competitions and exhibitions give a skewed appraisal that can overinflate one’s ego, or smash it for no reason. Always seek qualified and constructive advice.

Along the way it is common to reach a crisis of confidence in your work. This is especially true for professionals that rise too quickly, but is probably inevitable as you see too much of your own work and bore of it. Here, you must push on and consider a new inspiration, possibly a new genre.

In the end, we may not all reach the top percentile of photographers. Much depends on natural talent, luck, time and persistence, but we all have potential to be good and for our work to be recognized and admired by a wide audience.

Conclusion

In this article have charted out a lifetime’s worth of learning based around my philosophy of making art and telling a story, rather than executing photography. I have explained why I consider the art and meaning to be more important than both gear and technique and how it all fits together. Good photography is not simply a goal to be reached, it is an ongoing journey of development and the idea is to make images worth looking at from the beginning to the end.

Links to related articles:

The limited role of equipment and technique in photography
http://www.japancamerahunter.com/2013/12/limited-role-equipment-technique-photography/
Photography as part of the broader visual arts
http://www.japancamerahunter.com/2014/11/photography-part-broader-visual-arts-dan-k/
Your first 10,000 photographs may include some of your best
http://www.japancamerahunter.com/2013/06/your-first-10000-photographs-may-include-some-of-your-best/
How do you relieve photographer’s creative block
http://www.japancamerahunter.com/2015/03/relieve-photographers-creative-block-dan-k/

Also:
What Do You Have To Say and How Would You Say It?
http://erickimphotography.com/blog/2013/09/13/what-do-you-have-to-say-and-how-would-you-say-it/

About the Author

Dan K is a life-long enthusiast photographer, unabashed gear-head and reluctant artist. Follow him on twitter for a humorous look at photography techniques and technology from all eras. Follow him on Tumblr for his images, journey of photographic discovery and a generous helping of gear-porn.

Twitter
http://twitter.com/ZDP189
Tumblr
http://ZDP-189.tumblr.com/

Text and images © Dan K, except Stages of a Photographer (Original), which is from 4CHAN. All rights reserved.

Thanks to Dan for another fascinating and educational article. It is an honour to have this on the site.

JCH

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In your bag No: 1254 – Matt Ghttp://www.japancamerahunter.com/2015/08/in-your-bag-no-1254-matt-g/ http://www.japancamerahunter.com/2015/08/in-your-bag-no-1254-matt-g/#comments Sun, 30 Aug 2015 08:32:08 +0000 http://www.japancamerahunter.com/?p=21724 In your bag No: 1254, Matt G Matt shares with us a cracking bag. Not only are there some great cameras in the bag, but a book by possibly one of my favourite authors. Lovely stuff. Check it out. My name is Matt; I live in Switzerland. I’ve been shooting film and digital for the […]

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In your bag No: 1254, Matt G
Matt shares with us a cracking bag. Not only are there some great cameras in the bag, but a book by possibly one of my favourite authors. Lovely stuff. Check it out.

My name is Matt; I live in Switzerland. I’ve been shooting film and digital for the best part of 30 years now as an amateur.

I own a couple of dedicated camera bags that hold a variety of setups, these days, mainly digital. But I recently rediscovered film photography and enjoy it thoroughly, the process as well as the results; it leads to a much more considerate way of taking pictures.

That’s why my day-to-day bag contains a film camera – sometimes several.

The cornerstone of this new-found passion is a camera I’ve always lusted after: a Mamiya 6. A square medium format camera, but with retractable lens, thus reasonably light and compact, with aperture priority, including AEL, with a small, yet highly desirable choice of lenses … Who needs more? This camera has it all. And now I own one – thanks to Bellamy! And yes, it’s a fantastic camera to shoot!

So, let’s take a look into my rather crammed bag:

The bag itself is simply a Timbuk2 Classic Messenger (small); I have put in a generic camera inlet to add some padding. When I’m out taking pictures for fun (i.e. most of the time), it contains all or most of the following:

– The Mamiya 6 (it’s actually an “MF”, but I use it strictly for 6×6) with 75mm f/3.5 and hood; the strap is a Peak Design Leash – light and easily adjustable, and quick to remove (or replace by the Cuff – a wrist strap).

– A Zeiss Ikon Contessamat E, with lens hood – a 35mm rangefinder from the early 60’s, sporting a super-sharp 50mm f/2.8 Tessar; in spite of its age, the camera is in fantastic condition – even the light meter works! I will have it CLA’d some time soon – it’s worth it!

– At least one digital camera; these days, this usually means the Panasonic LX100; it’s as close as you can get to a classical RF experience without seriously breaking the bank. It’s actually an enjoyable camera to shoot; I’ve set it up to emulate an analog workflow.

– Most of the time, a toy camera, which to me means an instant camera, perferably the Lomo’Instant. It’s not capable of really good image quality, but quite often a spectacular one. Anyway, it’s fast and fun.

– A light meter; the Variosix F is already quite old, but I use it most of the time for its accuracy and versatility.

– A collection of film; at the moment, Ektar 100 is my mainstay for both formats I shoot; for B&W, I use mostly HP5+, but I’ve been planning to seriously try out the Acros 100 for a while now, that’s why it’s ready in the JCH case! Sometimes, I bring a spare Instax Mini film, too – especially if I know that there’ll be kids around …

– A ND4 filter for the Lomo’Instant (the only thing that didn’t make it onto the image) – the Instax film blows out in a very ugly way when overexposed.

– A lens pen and a cheap/free ball pen (something I don’t miss if I lose it).

– A (paperback) book, more often than not a Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett (“Reaper Man” happens to be one of my favourites – it features Death, saving the world …).

– Wallet, smartphone, small foldable shopping bag – live goes on even when you’re out shooting!

I shoot almost exclusively for fun; some of my stuff (mostly digital) is on Flickr: https://secure.flickr.com/photos/111481207@N03/

Have a good day – and don’t forget to take a picture or two!

Matt G.

Thanks for sharing your bag with us, Matt. That Zeiss Ikon is lovely, not often you see them being used anymore.
Check out the links and please make sure you come and comment.

Keep them coming folks, we need more submissions, so get your bag on Japancamerahunter.com.

Send me a hi resolution image of the bag. Optimum size is 1500 across. Please ensure there is a bag in the shot, unless you don’t use one. The more you can write about yourself the better, make it appealing and tell us a story.

Oh and don’t forget your contact details (twitter, flickr, tumbler et al). Send the bag shots here. Please understand that there is a long wait now as there is a backlog of submissions. Not all make the cut, so make sure yours is funny/interesting/quirky. And please make sure the shot is of good quality, as the ones that are not do not go up.

Cheers
Japancamerahunter

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Get Featured: Carl LaMaitrehttp://www.japancamerahunter.com/2015/08/get-featured-carl-lamaitre/ http://www.japancamerahunter.com/2015/08/get-featured-carl-lamaitre/#comments Sat, 29 Aug 2015 16:44:18 +0000 http://www.japancamerahunter.com/?p=21626 Get Featured: Carl LaMaitre Carl shares with us a little project about how the earthquake in Christchurch NZ has changed the city and how the city has evolved since the devastation. Check it out. Christchurch “red zone” This was at the end of a round trip of the south island with my wife last year. […]

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Get Featured: Carl LaMaitre
Carl shares with us a little project about how the earthquake in Christchurch NZ has changed the city and how the city has evolved since the devastation. Check it out.

Christchurch “red zone”
This was at the end of a round trip of the south island with my wife last year. Not knowing the full extent of the damage that was inflicted on christchurch we arrived around midday with every thing in full light so nothing was missed on the drive in.

Most of the outer lying suburbs were not that bad with only small dwellings that were unaffected buy the earthquake. The first effect i seen of the quake was on the first morning i woke in the camper van park.
There is a phenomena that happens during quakes called aquifers, its when the water table is affected buy the movement of the plates and pushes water up to the surface causing flooding in low lying areas or in this case anywahere. most of the city was flooded, including almost all of the underground car parks and basements.
In the CBD which is now referred to as the “RED ZONE” was of limits for a long time with unstable larger building waiting to be accessed buy engineers.

By the time we arrived most of the building were begining to be rebuilt or demolished, but i also witnessed how the local people were coming together to get on with their daily life. there was an abundance of street art, installations, street graph, murals and a pop up mall.

This was in the middle of the CBD and its made out of shipping containers. book shops, pizza shops, clothing shops and even banks, all engineered out of shipping containers.
Nothing will stop the people of christchurch to reclaim their home, even though they lost 168 of their friends and family.

There is a new life to the city and it keeps growing out of the rubble.
just to take the piss … their bus system shits on that of Sydney! and half their roads area FUCKED!

It was amazing to witness.

I switch between film and digital depending on what i’m shooting.
If i have the urge to make photographs, film is the only way i can see to do this. If i’m just shooting day to day stuff digital seems to be way to convenient. As far as on going projects again film has a “deeper” feel to it.

With gear i don’t tend to latch on to cameras and more let my financial situation govern what i shoot with.
The Christchurch project was shot on a Leica MP with a Konica hexanon 35mm F2 with expired kodak E100vs.
ATM im shooting with a voightlander R2 ( the old version) with the leather pealing off. but it feels so right.
you don’t have to worry about the camera & just focus on shooting.
i also have a nikon D610 with a few AIS lenses 24mm f2.8 / 35mm f2 /50mm f1.2. i can cover most thing with this set up. For the “nights out” i have a Ricoh GR. amazing little piece of work.

Also i run a small underground surfboard shaping business on the northern beaches.
No advertising, purely for locals only, so the offer is still there if you want to drop in for a surf.

Thanks mate
Carl LaMaitre

lemeat.wordpress.com
instagram.com/carl_lamaitre

Thanks for sharing your work with us, Carl. It is amazing to see how the people have adapted. I went to Christchurch many years ago and loved the city. It was saddening to see the devastating quake. But it is cool to see new hope too.

Come on, share with us what you have and get yourself featured.
Click on this link and send in your project/work: Get Featured. *I am looking for mainly projects, not individual images*
Oh, and click here to see a few of the photographers that have been on the site before http://www.japancamerahunter.com/?s=featured

Please make sure you come and comment, polite and constructive critique is welcome.
Thanks
JCH

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In your bag No: 1253 – Matthias Winkelhttp://www.japancamerahunter.com/2015/08/in-your-bag-no-1253-matthias-winkel/ http://www.japancamerahunter.com/2015/08/in-your-bag-no-1253-matthias-winkel/#comments Fri, 28 Aug 2015 18:35:58 +0000 http://www.japancamerahunter.com/?p=21708 In your bag No: 1253, Matthias Winkel Matthias has a very straightforward bag, that is far from being lightweight. This is some serious kit. Two outstanding cameras, which he seemed to get for total bargains. Check it out. Hello, My Name is Matthias Winkel, living in Hamburg/Germany. I started to take pictures with my parents […]

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In your bag No: 1253, Matthias Winkel
Matthias has a very straightforward bag, that is far from being lightweight. This is some serious kit. Two outstanding cameras, which he seemed to get for total bargains. Check it out.

Hello,
My Name is Matthias Winkel, living in Hamburg/Germany. I started to take pictures with my parents old Zenit SLR, which must have been 15 years ago at the age of 18. Being an active person I always dislike to bring heavy equipment to my journeys. On the other Hand I love good quality and diversity in formats. And I really dislike to spend too much Money. I want to be able to shoot a portrait, a skate trick, landscape, long exposure, colour and black/white without really having a big backpack with – while always shooting film. Soooooo you see here my very practical, maybe boring solution. Keep it simple

Leica M6ttl, with an older 50mm Summilux – orange filter is always on for b/w. I Never really wanted a Leica, but a friend of Mine Told me that it’s a Camera that would fit me very well. He kinda put something in my Head and one day I found an amazing offer in a photo shop in Hamburg. Let’s put it that way: it would have been still a good offer for a heavy used m3 – not a Brand new m6.

The Tx1 was a great offer too. After looking for months on the bay someone put this barely touched beauty online – for half the prize of a XPAN and with the original grip. Couldn’t Be more lucky with that. The 90mm came a year later, also Way cheaper then expected. Wouldn’t say I’m the germancamerahunter, but Hey we all love lucky offers.
Tripod is something chinese and not italien. It does it’s job.

The Bag is a simple hip bag from chrome, fits in a camera, extras and a lens. Other camera and tripod get wrapped around the shoulder. The cable release is missing on that picture. It’s usually the item I forget to bring too.
Take note: Support your local photo lab, buy there film and keep that thing alive. Buy Leicas for cheap from rich people who don’t shoot. Be Robin Hood.

If you want to See some of my work: apictureofbrandon.tumblr.com

High 5, Matthias

Thanks for sharing your bag with us, Matthias. Very cool, the GermanCameraHunter, haha.
Check out the links and please make sure you come and comment.

Keep them coming folks, we need more submissions, so get your bag on Japancamerahunter.com.

Send me a hi resolution image of the bag. Optimum size is 1500 across. Please ensure there is a bag in the shot, unless you don’t use one. The more you can write about yourself the better, make it appealing and tell us a story.

Oh and don’t forget your contact details (twitter, flickr, tumbler et al). Send the bag shots here. Please understand that there is a long wait now as there is a backlog of submissions. Not all make the cut, so make sure yours is funny/interesting/quirky. And please make sure the shot is of good quality, as the ones that are not do not go up.

Cheers
Japancamerahunter

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In your bag No: 1252 – Paul Schofieldhttp://www.japancamerahunter.com/2015/08/in-your-bag-no-1252-paul-schofield/ http://www.japancamerahunter.com/2015/08/in-your-bag-no-1252-paul-schofield/#comments Wed, 26 Aug 2015 20:51:06 +0000 http://www.japancamerahunter.com/?p=21702 In your bag No: 1252, Paul Schofield Paul has been on the site loads of times in the past, with bag shots, articles and more. Now he shares with us his third bag shot, which also happens to contain his daughters camera too. Oh and that sticker on the filmcase, lovely. Check it out. This […]

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In your bag No: 1252, Paul Schofield
Paul has been on the site loads of times in the past, with bag shots, articles and more. Now he shares with us his third bag shot, which also happens to contain his daughters camera too. Oh and that sticker on the filmcase, lovely. Check it out.

This is my third ‘In Your Bag’ and for me it’s a special one. We’re about to do a house swap in Amsterdam for a fortnight and this is what my youngest daughter and I are taking with us.

Domke F3 – Very well made and very ‘no frills’. Can’t really imagine ever needing another bag.

Fuji Finepix AX – My daughter’s first camera was a pink 1.5 megapixel Vtech Kidizoom with a binocular viewfinder. The Fuji is a big improvement and like most cameras these days (except the Kidizoom), the Fuji takes respectable pictures. Photography is not quite an obsession for her yet but she’s produced one or two great shots with the new camera, including this one (http://photographicdad.tumblr.com/post/122098226650/frank-by-summer) of Frank, our geriatric Labrador cross. I’ve been taking pictures of my dog for years and never come close to capturing his personality in the way that this picture does. An eight year old has no pre-conceptions of what a ‘good’ picture should look like and here, with the help of her sister, she has set up what for us will always be the definitive portrait of our dog.

Nikon F5 with Nikkor 50/1.8 AF-D – Despite recent attempts to reduce my film habit on the grounds of cost, I’m using film more than ever and this is the latest addition to the camera drawer. I wanted an AF film camera that would allow me to shoot my kids wide-open and still nail focus – my kids move fast but the F5 is more than up to it. Everything you need to know about this camera is here (http://www.japancamerahunter.com/2011/08/the-wonderful-nikon-f5/) and one major attraction is the fact that good examples are dirt cheep. It’s hard to over state how good the F5 is – the only real drawback is weight (1.6kg with batteries and lens attached). In a modern context, the ratio of weight to resolution is extremely poor and there are loads of smaller 35mm cameras for film photographers to choose from. So a 35mm SLR that was unsurpassed in the late 90s now seems largely redundant to most. But this is film we’re talking about – normal rules don’t apply. I’m more than happy to lug this beautiful camera around with me and although it’s probably too conspicuous for stealthy street use (which is not really my thing anyway) it’s good for just about everything else.

Nikkor 28/2.8 AI – The 50/1.8 is contemporary to the F5 and does the job for the price of a few packets of chips. In complete contrast to the F5, though, the build quality is terrible – cheap plastic rubbish compared to all-metal manual Nikkors. This AI lens is always over-shadowed by the supposedly sharper and more expensive AIS version but the difference is pretty meaningless – it’s still a great lens. Along with 50mm, I am happiest with this focal length – it was given to me for nothing and I’ve just adapted to it.

JCH Film Holder – Packed with Kodak T-Max 400 plus two rolls of Agfa Precisa 100 transparency film. The sticker reminds me of the good old days.

Tiffen Yellow 2 and Cokin 81A warm up filters.

Brush and cloth.

As usual, the summer holidays are a time of dizzying excitement from a photographic point of view – we live in a rural area so spending time in a major city like Amsterdam will be a welcome change of scene. I’ve recently starting using the darkroom at the DCA in Dundee, developing my own black and white film, producing contact sheets and then doing 5×7 prints. Re-discovering this part of the process has been so rewarding and it’s also been interesting to see how the kids react when they are given a print. A hand made print does mean more than some picture on a screen and they know that without needing to be told. Kids are pretty smart, really.

http://photo-dad.tumblr.com

Thanks for sharing your bag with us again Paul. This one is brilliant. Your daughter is off to a great start.
Check out the links and please make sure you come and comment.

Keep them coming folks, we need more submissions, so get your bag on Japancamerahunter.com.

Send me a hi resolution image of the bag. Optimum size is 1500 across. Please ensure there is a bag in the shot, unless you don’t use one. The more you can write about yourself the better, make it appealing and tell us a story.

Oh and don’t forget your contact details (twitter, flickr, tumbler et al). Send the bag shots here. Please understand that there is a long wait now as there is a backlog of submissions. Not all make the cut, so make sure yours is funny/interesting/quirky. And please make sure the shot is of good quality, as the ones that are not do not go up.

Cheers
Japancamerahunter

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Photography: Rescued Memories Pt: 2http://www.japancamerahunter.com/2015/08/photography-rescued-memories-pt-2/ http://www.japancamerahunter.com/2015/08/photography-rescued-memories-pt-2/#comments Tue, 25 Aug 2015 03:42:23 +0000 http://www.japancamerahunter.com/?p=21687 Photography: Rescued Memories Pt: 2 Here in this second instalment of the series (I hope there are more too) I share with you all some more images that I have scanned from the vintage films I have gathered. All seem to be from the US in the 40’s, 50’s and 60’s. It takes a long […]

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Photography: Rescued Memories Pt: 2
Here in this second instalment of the series (I hope there are more too) I share with you all some more images that I have scanned from the vintage films I have gathered. All seem to be from the US in the 40’s, 50’s and 60’s. It takes a long time to flatten out and arrange the heaps of old films I have acquired in the past few years. So this is definitely a project that I have to leave to my spare time. But it is a lovely project, looking back over the years of negatives gives me a delightful look at a world that is no more. The world sure has changed…

In this batch there are a lot of military based images. Ships, training grounds and what looks to be people horsing around with what I can only assume is loot brought back from Europe. I would really love to know where the images were taken, but that info is just not there. No EXIF files for this lot. I wonder if anyone out there recognises these?

As you can see, this chap seems to be enjoying himself with what I can only assume is something that he or a friend kept as a battle souvenir of their time in Europe. It is interesting in that this image would be seen in a very different light nowadays.

But then, there are a lot of images in this batch of a bunch of guys having fun and what looks to be getting a bit smashed. I guess they probably earned it. Judging by the images I would say it is the 50’s and people were living the high life.

There are county fairs and people enjoying road trips and all sorts. The photography was quite haphazard and not all that many of the shots actually come out, remember though, metered cameras were not really all that common and photography for everyman was just becoming a thing.  But when they do come out you get to see some real Americana.

The clothes, that attitudes. The people in the US were on a high and you can really see it come through in this batch of films. Enjoying the scenery (before it was all polluted to hell or mined up etc). You can almost feel the optimism in the images.

America was just about to go through some serious changes, and this seems to be like an age of innocence (or perhaps blissful ignorance would be a better term), the calm before the storm.

I have a whole bunch more of these, and I will do my best to get through them as time permits. If you have any questions about the images, or even perhaps know anyone in them then get in touch.

Don’t forget to come and comment too.

Cheers
JCH

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In your bag No: 1251 – Po Bunyapamaihttp://www.japancamerahunter.com/2015/08/in-your-bag-no-1251-po-bunyapamai/ http://www.japancamerahunter.com/2015/08/in-your-bag-no-1251-po-bunyapamai/#comments Mon, 24 Aug 2015 10:39:13 +0000 http://www.japancamerahunter.com/?p=21682 In your bag No: 1251, Po Bunyapamai From a non bag, to the mother of all bags. That is how it goes on JCH. Po is going on a backpacking trip and this is the whopper of a bag that will go across Europe. Check it out. Hi Bellamy, today I am presenting to you […]

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In your bag No: 1251, Po Bunyapamai
From a non bag, to the mother of all bags. That is how it goes on JCH. Po is going on a backpacking trip and this is the whopper of a bag that will go across Europe. Check it out.

Hi Bellamy, today I am presenting to you and your readers the bag I will be bringing with me on a month long trip to Europe. I was last featured exactly a hundred bags ago at 1117.

My main cameras will be the Konica Hexar AF and my trusty Olympus E-P5.

The close up photo is missing the E-P5 because it is shot with the camera. The overview, in order to get everything present, is shot with the iPhone 6.

Everything here fits into a Gregory 65 Liter backpack.

Let’s start with the most important things in the middle:
– Konica Hexar AF
– Olympus E-P5 mounted with 17mm f/1.8 lens
– Olympus 12-40 f/2.8 lens

Now from left to right:
– Blue wind/rainproof jacket
– Very comfortable grey hoodie
– SF Giants baseball cap. I bought this during the parade when they won the World Series back in 2013
– assortment of clothes and toiletries in a packing cube
– headlamp
– iPad 3 with navy leather cover
– 30 pin USB cable
– lightning USB cable
– 12W USB power adapter
– iPad 30 pin SD card reader
– thick envelope to house the iPad
– lens cleaning cloth
– Etymotic Research hf2 noise isolating earphones, with foam ear tips. In my opinion, these are the best travel earphones money can buy. It’s like using earplugs, but there’s music!
– extra foam ear tips
– international driver’s license
– passport
– 2x Sensor Swabs, in the event that dust gets on my sensor
– lip balm
– 46mm three stop neutral density filter. For the Konica Hexar because its shutter speed tops out at 1/250 sec
– 46mm circular polarizing filter. Luckily these two fit both the Konica Hexar and 17mm lens
– extra battery for the E-P5
– 0.5mm microdot pen
– 18 rolls of Ilford Delta 400 film and 30 rolls of Ilford FP4+ all bulk loaded from 100 feet rolls
– JCH 35mm mini case with an assortment of the two films
– lens cleaning fluid
– spare battery for the Konica Hexar AF
– card reader
– E-P5 battery charger
– black power cable
– film lead retriever
– Gorillapod with ball head
– polarized sunglasses
– my very reliable Klean Kanteen water bottle

Next to the backpack at the top right is a fanny pack I got earlier this year from a thrift store in Portland. It’s great for fitting so many things while making them readily accessible. Be it film, lenses, passports, etc

Thanks for the feature Bellamy
You can find my commercial work at http://cole-bunyapamai.squarespace.com
And follow me on this trip via Instagram at @pobunyapamai

Thanks for sharing your whopper of a bag with us, Po. I still laugh when I read ‘fanny pack’.
Check out the links and please make sure you come and comment.

Keep them coming folks, we need more submissions, so get your bag on Japancamerahunter.com.

Send me a hi resolution image of the bag. Optimum size is 1500 across. Please ensure there is a bag in the shot, unless you don’t use one. The more you can write about yourself the better, make it appealing and tell us a story.

Oh and don’t forget your contact details (twitter, flickr, tumbler et al). Send the bag shots here. Please understand that there is a long wait now as there is a backlog of submissions. Not all make the cut, so make sure yours is funny/interesting/quirky. And please make sure the shot is of good quality, as the ones that are not do not go up.

Cheers
Japancamerahunter

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