In your bag No: 1252 – Paul Schofield

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by Bellamy /

4 min read
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In your bag No: 1252, Paul Schofield
Paul has been on the site loads of times in the past, with bag shots, articles and more. Now he shares with us his third bag shot, which also happens to contain his daughters camera too. Oh and that sticker on the filmcase, lovely. Check it out.

This is my third ‘In Your Bag’ and for me it’s a special one. We’re about to do a house swap in Amsterdam for a fortnight and this is what my youngest daughter and I are taking with us.

Domke F3 – Very well made and very ‘no frills’. Can’t really imagine ever needing another bag.

Fuji Finepix AX – My daughter’s first camera was a pink 1.5 megapixel Vtech Kidizoom with a binocular viewfinder. The Fuji is a big improvement and like most cameras these days (except the Kidizoom), the Fuji takes respectable pictures. Photography is not quite an obsession for her yet but she’s produced one or two great shots with the new camera, including this one (http://photographicdad.tumblr.com/post/122098226650/frank-by-summer) of Frank, our geriatric Labrador cross. I’ve been taking pictures of my dog for years and never come close to capturing his personality in the way that this picture does. An eight year old has no pre-conceptions of what a ‘good’ picture should look like and here, with the help of her sister, she has set up what for us will always be the definitive portrait of our dog.

Nikon F5 with Nikkor 50/1.8 AF-D – Despite recent attempts to reduce my film habit on the grounds of cost, I’m using film more than ever and this is the latest addition to the camera drawer. I wanted an AF film camera that would allow me to shoot my kids wide-open and still nail focus – my kids move fast but the F5 is more than up to it. Everything you need to know about this camera is here (http://www.japancamerahunter.com/2011/08/the-wonderful-nikon-f5/) and one major attraction is the fact that good examples are dirt cheep. It’s hard to over state how good the F5 is – the only real drawback is weight (1.6kg with batteries and lens attached). In a modern context, the ratio of weight to resolution is extremely poor and there are loads of smaller 35mm cameras for film photographers to choose from. So a 35mm SLR that was unsurpassed in the late 90s now seems largely redundant to most. But this is film we’re talking about – normal rules don’t apply. I’m more than happy to lug this beautiful camera around with me and although it’s probably too conspicuous for stealthy street use (which is not really my thing anyway) it’s good for just about everything else.

Nikkor 28/2.8 AI – The 50/1.8 is contemporary to the F5 and does the job for the price of a few packets of chips. In complete contrast to the F5, though, the build quality is terrible – cheap plastic rubbish compared to all-metal manual Nikkors. This AI lens is always over-shadowed by the supposedly sharper and more expensive AIS version but the difference is pretty meaningless – it’s still a great lens. Along with 50mm, I am happiest with this focal length – it was given to me for nothing and I’ve just adapted to it.

JCH Film Holder – Packed with Kodak T-Max 400 plus two rolls of Agfa Precisa 100 transparency film. The sticker reminds me of the good old days.

Tiffen Yellow 2 and Cokin 81A warm up filters.

Brush and cloth.

As usual, the summer holidays are a time of dizzying excitement from a photographic point of view – we live in a rural area so spending time in a major city like Amsterdam will be a welcome change of scene. I’ve recently starting using the darkroom at the DCA in Dundee, developing my own black and white film, producing contact sheets and then doing 5×7 prints. Re-discovering this part of the process has been so rewarding and it’s also been interesting to see how the kids react when they are given a print. A hand made print does mean more than some picture on a screen and they know that without needing to be told. Kids are pretty smart, really.

http://photo-dad.tumblr.com

Thanks for sharing your bag with us again Paul. This one is brilliant. Your daughter is off to a great start.
Check out the links and please make sure you come and comment.

Keep them coming folks, we need more submissions, so get your bag on Japancamerahunter.com.

Send me a hi resolution image of the bag. Optimum size is 1500 across. Please ensure there is a bag in the shot, unless you don’t use one. The more you can write about yourself the better, make it appealing and tell us a story.

Oh and don’t forget your contact details (twitter, flickr, tumbler et al). Send the bag shots here. Please understand that there is a long wait now as there is a backlog of submissions. Not all make the cut, so make sure yours is funny/interesting/quirky. And please make sure the shot is of good quality, as the ones that are not do not go up.

Cheers
Japancamerahunter

4 comments on “In your bag No: 1252 – Paul Schofield”

    Alex_M_V August 27, 2015 at 12:30 pm / Reply

    clicked on the tumblr link not expecting much. i must say, pretty awesome work for “dad” pics. keep shooting film, it looks great.

    Nelson Tan August 27, 2015 at 9:33 pm / Reply

    Really lovely photos in your Tumblr. Keep it up! :)

    Ross August 27, 2015 at 9:38 pm / Reply

    A really wonderful story Paul and seeing the pictures of the family on Tumblr just completed it!

    And what a cool guy Frank is! A brilliant photo. I have no doubt he is a complete character. Well done to your daughter for capturing that moment. It just goes to show you don’t need a fancy camera at all.

    Tina Kino November 21, 2015 at 8:08 pm / Reply

    ..unfortunately the tumblr seems offline?

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