In your bag No: 1183 – David

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by Bellamy /

4 min read
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In your bag No: 1183, David
David, that is all I have for a name. But David does have a rather cool bag. Some funky pinhole cameras including one that is gome made. Check this one out.

Hello, my name is David!

I am from the Philippines but am currently residing in Japan. Seeing all the entries here up on the site inspired me to share my own set up for my gaijin (foreigner) photowalks.

On my usual photowalks, I carry around my Manfrotto Unica V with added padding for my camera gear. I really love the easy-access zipper which helps me whip out my camera whenever I need it. Its color and discreetness also helps me keep a low profile in various situations. Moreover, when it rains, I really don’t find myself worrying about my stuff because i know the bag can handle it.

When it’s not raining outside, my board becomes my best friend. Skating has been a big part of my life so I just have to bring it even when I’m on photowalks. It’s kinda difficult to weave around people especially in a booming metropolis like Tokyo but when I go to places like Hakone, Kamakura and anywhere else, this thing helps me get around faster.

My camera is a Nikon D7000 with an MB-D11 which instantly became my favorite camera because of the ease of use and personal options. I usually carry around three lenses of my choice when I go out and it’s usually my workhorses, the 28mm and 50mm and a special lens (Lensbaby, Holga or Petzval). Recently, I’ve been lugging around my Lensbaby Sweet 35 which is very difficult to use but gives interesting results. I have always been a fan of manual focus so I do not currently own any auto-focus lens.

I also have three other cameras with me with which I use to challenge my photography. [Backstory] I started taking photos with a film camera for a school-wide competition back in high school and I had no idea what I was doing but by God’s grace, I made it all the way to the nationals and took home 4th. It was then that I decided to push to learn more about it but due to budget constraints, I couldn’t really get my hands on my own camera until 5 years later. I still found ways through borrowing cameras but yeah, it wasn’t the same. [/Backstory] Now that I’ve gotten to know my digital camera a bit better, I sort of went back to my roots and relearned film photography with my own twist. I’ve had my fair share of bad rolls but hey, it’s all part of it. Please allow me to talk about the three small cameras I have in the following paragraphs.

I bought the disposable camera so I can salvage the parts. When I finish the roll of film inside, I dismantle it myself and remove the viewfinder and lens so I can use them in the future for a camera I can make by myself. If I didn’t need the parts at the moment, I would usually have my RedCamera TwoWayVista with me loaded with cheap Fujicolor ISO 100 film.

The second green-ish camera is a pinhole camera I made myself with native wood from Japan. It’s the second version of an earlier one I did which gave me excellent results but this one is still currently in the testing phase because of some minor issues. It snaps easily to my Joby Gorillapod so I can just set up anywhere (almost). This really helps me slow down and think of my photograph rather than just going around and snapping pictures like a mad man.

The third camera is my latest creation and is also my favorite one. It’s a half-frame camera I made from wood and parts of a disposable camera. I have to say, even though it’s not as sharp as I would want it to be, I’m fairly pleased with the results.

(I have other homemade cameras that I wish I could use but film is expensive sooooooooooo yeah. Haha)

I also tote around stuff like my Vapur water pouch all rolled up for easy storage, extra memory cards, an extra roll of film, a lenspen, a blower, my iPad with SD card reader, and of course, my sunglasses.

My style of photography is very…..primitive (?). I actually don’t know the right word for it but I am really fascinated with the early beginnings of photography. The pinhole, box cameras, and the like really amazed me that’s why I went ahead and made my own cameras and bought my Petzval lens. I have another project lined up for me actually but I’ll save that for another time.

If you would like to, you can check out some of my work here:

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/thegaijinproject

Tumblr: http://thegaijinproject.tumblr.com

Feel free to ask me about anything. :) Thank you and God bless!

– David

Thanks for sharing your gear with us, David. I love those pinhole cameras too.
Check out the links and make sure you come and comment.

Keep them coming folks, we need more submissions, so get your bag on Japancamerahunter.com.

Send me a hi resolution image of the bag. Optimum size is 1500 across. Please ensure there is a bag in the shot, unless you don’t use one. The more you can write about yourself the better, make it appealing and tell us a story.

Oh and don’t forget your contact details (twitter, flickr, tumbler et al). Send the bag shots here. Please understand that there is a long wait now as there is a backlog of submissions. Not all make the cut, so make sure yours is funny/interesting/quirky. And please make sure the shot is of good quality, as the ones that are not do not go up.

Cheers
Japancamerahunter

3 comments on “In your bag No: 1183 – David”

    Jesse May 13, 2015 at 9:16 am / Reply

    Wow! I love the pinhole cameras! How did you make them? Is there a place you could direct me to get more info on pinhole shooting?

    David May 13, 2015 at 1:56 pm / Reply

    Thank you for this, Bellamy! :)

    David May 13, 2015 at 1:58 pm / Reply

    Hello, Jesse!

    My cameras were mostly trial and error (spent a lot of money on film and developing). Hahah. I just researched how pinholes worked, found a way to advance and rewind the film and then constructed the cameras using wood I bought from a store in Japan. :)

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