In your bag No: 403 – Julián Péter

Posted on by Bellamy


In your bag 403, Julián Péter
We have a re-visit today. Julián has been on the site before and now he is back with a new bag for you all to see. He has put this bag together for a project that promises to be very interesting.

Hello JCH and fellow photographers out there all over the world!

My name is Julián Péter and I have been featured before, actually, mine was bag #146 (http://japancamerahunter.com/2012/05/in-your-bag-146-julian-peter/). Since then, I have learned more about photography, as well as acquired a couple of new cameras.

To start off with a little bit of a background, I am 22-years old student of Maritime Studies in Bratislava, Slovak Republic. At the moment, I spend my time in between home and sailing on various ocean-going cargo vessels. It is a part of the required training. While on board, besides working as a crewmember, I focus on covering the daily lives of seafarers. It is, in my opinion, a very under-covered topic, especially if you know that almost 90% of all world trade is carried by international shipping. My mission is to show the public a little bit of what goes on behind the scenes in bringing them their daily wants and need. Hence, my new project (http://julianpeter.portfoliobox.me/new-project-tour-de-force/)!

So, onto what actually is in my bag. What you see is basically all the photographic gear I am bringing along for this voyage.

- Zorki 4k with Industar 50mm lens: A rangefinder from the former Soviet Union, loaded with Agfa CT Precisa 100 slide film. Tough as a tank, just recently dropped it from more than a meter onto stone slab flooring, barely a scratch. I got the slides from an Austrian shop chain Müller, dirty cheap. Check it out if you see one in your area! And of course, so I don’t drop the camera again, a Lance wrist strap, as seen on your very own JCH.

- Additional leftover rolls of Kodak BW400CN in a homemade film case, also seen on JCH “In your bag?”

- Nikon Coolpix P310 with spare memory card: The latest addition to the family, great f1.8 lens, full manual control. It will be the primary camera for the project as I can carry it out anywhere on deck in my pocket and it won’t get in the way.

- the beloved Meopta Flexaret II TLR: Because why not, right? Built like a champ in 1948, still works perfectly. Three full boxes of Kodak Portra 400 to feed it.

- a batch of business cards

Onto the next shot!

- the actual bag, Lowepro: Generic camera bag, but hold everything exactly in place for going through airport checks.

- First Aid Kit and Victorinox Swiss Army knife: Essential.

- lens cloth and mini brush: Dust! Dust everywhere!

- light bendy-leg tripod

- collection of notebooks with Sharpie pen: For notes, thoughts and writing down reports. It is called photojournalism for a reason!

- Bonus: An awesome photograph of my dad taking a photograph back in the day. I guess it is in my genes…

I hope you liked what you saw and till next time! ;)

Good light,
Julián

Don’t forget to check out these awesome links, I know you want to!

- Portfolio: http://julianpeter.portfoliobox.me (shout-out to the guys at Portfoliobox.net, you are truly awesome!)
- Facebook: http://facebook.com/julianpeterphotography
- Twitter: http://twitter.com/julspeterphoto

Thanks for sharing your second bag with us Julián, and thanks for sharing your project idea, I hope it all goes well for you.
Check out the links and the previous bag and make sure you come and comment.

Keep them coming folks, we need more submissions, so get your bag on Japancamerahunter.com. Send me a hi resolution image of the bag (please make sure it is horizontal) and its contents, with some details about yourself and what you shoot. Oh and don’t forget your contact details (twitter, flickr, tumbler et al). Send the bag shots here.

Cheers
Japancamerahunter

7 Responses to In your bag No: 403 – Julián Péter

Benicio January 25, 2013 at 10:44 am

Zorki 4K! I do so love playing with that camera. mine has light leaks form the shutter curtain though :(

Reply
    Julián Péter January 25, 2013 at 3:57 pm

    It sure does have its fair share of quirks. Mine has the RF patch way to the right of the viewfinder. I had bad rolls from it, but also good ones. But I love it to death. Speaking of, built like it is, it will most definitely survive me. Too bad to hear about the lightleaks, I am sure there are people out there who do CLAs. Try the Zorki group on Flickr.

    Reply
Sfinrod January 25, 2013 at 5:31 pm

A Victorinox Swiss Army knife going through airport checks, how is that possible? The other night I though: what if I sign to work in a ship, go around the world for a few months, working, taking pictures and writing, just because it sounds like an adventure, right? Btw, I like your TLR.

Reply
    Julián Péter January 25, 2013 at 6:16 pm

    Magic. Magic of having a second suitcase which gets checked in.
    Well, you make it sound all really romantic, but having sailed and worked on board, the reality is a bit different. It is an especially demanding job. Not only physically, but also mentally, as you are separated from all your family and friends for long periods of times. It is not for everyone. But I have to agree, it is an adventure. I have seen beautiful and amazing things I will never forget. And met quite a number of great people along the way.

    Reply
Ľubomír Brindza January 25, 2013 at 5:38 pm

Sweet bag, AND a story to go with it? Yes please. I like your work.

I have both of those film cameras; shame my Flexaret is relegated to dust collection duty because of a stuck shutter.

Where are your parents from though; originally? Your name could almost pass for a native Slovak one, but not quite :)

Reply

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