The Rolleicord Vb Xenar 75mm

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by Bellamy /

2 min read

The Rolleicord TLR, a beautiful and capable camera
I have always been a bit of a fan of the TLR camera, and there are not many more beautiful than Rolleiflex cameras. Rolleicord cameras were designed to be the less expensive brothers of the Rolleiflex cameras, but that does not mean they are any less capable. Nowadays when you think of a cheaper version of a camera, you can obviously see the difference. But this camera comes from a different era, when quality was much higher.

This camera is the beautiful Rolleicord Vb Type 2. The serial number suggests that this was an earlier type 2, produced in the early 70’s. At the time of production this was considered be be almost on par with the Rolleiflex cameras of the time. You can tell the rough date of production of this camera not only from the serial number, but from the Rollei-Worke in large type under the taking lens. After 1971 this was changed to a smaller type.
The Vb features a Xenar 75mm f3.5 Schneider Kreuznach taking lens and a Schneider Heidosmat 75mm focusing lens. It comes with a Syncro Compur 1/500 shutter and X-sync and will take 12 frames on 120 film 6X6.

But aside from all of technical details, this is a very beautiful camera. The classic design makes look like an antique, something from a bygone age. To me this is the ultimate self portrait camera, as it looks so cool in the shot that you cannot help but to include it. As this camera is meterless, you have to either train yourself very well to gauge light or you have to carry a light meter with you, which is not such a bad thing really. Using a TLR really trains you to be patient, as you have to really work on your framing. Some might say it is not really a street camera, but you only have to look at the work of people like Vivian Maier to see that it is a very capable street camera in the right hands.

This particular camera is in absolutely mint condition. It comes with the original hard leather carry case, hood, filters and strap. It is a stunning collectors piece and worthy of anyones collection, but it is also a wonderful users camera, and does not deserve to sit on a shelf for the rest of its days.
If you are interested in this camera and would like to purchase it, you can contact me for more details by clicking here.
Please don’t be afraid to leave comments. I love to hear what you all think. It helps me make what I do better.
Thanks
Japancamerahunter

5 comments on “The Rolleicord Vb Xenar 75mm”

    Kosta December 19, 2011 at 5:27 am / Reply

    what a beauty! I have a similar one I think Va?

    they are gorgeous cameras and a strange joy to use.

    Juan December 20, 2011 at 11:18 am / Reply

    How much do you want for this rolleicord vb 2 ?

      Bellamy December 20, 2011 at 4:47 pm /

      Hi, thanks for the message. I am afraid that the camera has already sold.
      Thanks

    Patrick Wilson April 1, 2013 at 6:50 pm / Reply

    Yes ,they are a nice camera,I purchased one in 1967/68 from R G Lewis in London.I also purchased the 16 on attachment which allowed you to take 16 exposures on a roll of 120 film.It came with the necessary masks and film counter.It meant you could take what I think they refer to as supaslides(transparencies). I think I paid about £65 for camera & case and about £15 for the 16on attachment.

    David Murray July 22, 2015 at 9:53 pm / Reply

    The Twin Lens Reflex Camera is an experience no serious photographer should miss out on. I purchased one in 1984, it was a Rolleiflex Old Standard (thats what I was told at the time) and had been dated to 1933. Along with a Weston Master IV and Invercone attachment plus the ancient original leather cases for camera and meter, I used this combination the length and breadth of the country until 2002 when the shutter developed an annoying fault. I sought help and was told that the linkage between the wind-on and the shutter cocking was broken. Was quoted a fortune to repair. Traded in against a Canon F1 that I still have.
    I began to miss it though as I’d began displaying it on a bookcase shelf and now regretted parting with it. In 2008, after receiving a legacy, I bought a Hasselblad 500CM with standard lens and ever-ready case. At #450, it was 10X what I’d paid for the Rolleiflex. I have only ever shot transparency film in 6X6 and now have an old wooden cutlery box full of the slides, sandwiched in Gepe glass mounts. Sometimes, on long dark winter nights, I get them out and view them on a small battery-powered viewer. Even some of the early ones taken on the ancient Rollei still sparkle and are every bit as good as the Hasselblad ones. If I were to buy another TLR it would be a 1930s Rolleicord as the mechanisms internally are much simpler with far less to go wrong. And I would only buy one with an original leather case.

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